Pedroia at Short: Desperation or Due Diligence?

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redsox 255, originally uploaded by h8rnet.

The moment Peter Gammons elevated the talk of Pedroia moving from second back to short from rumor to fact via a couple of quotes typical for last year’s MVP, it was on. Cafardo, scooped, effectively dismissed the suggestion. To Mazz, it predictably was read as a sign that the club was a “little desperate“. Edes – and I’ll get to his return to the scene eventually – characterized the conversations as “casual.”

Among the national media, Law was skeptical he could handle the position and Neyer intimated that the Sox wouldn’t consider the move if they didn’t believe – based on the data – that he could potentially handle it. Also, that it meant Pedroia was a great teammate.

Myself? I think this is posturing. Nothing more.

Did the Sox talk to Pedroia? I’m sure they did. Did they consider the option of moving him? Undoubtedly. As they should.

Consider the infielders we’ve been linked to this offseaon: Scutaro, Kennedy, Everett, DeRosa and Crosby. And those are just the ones we know about. Who’s to say how much time Theo’s spent on the phone talking Stephen Drew, Yunel Escobar or someone really cool we don’t even know about.

Point being: the Red Sox are doing, in talking to Pedroia and pretty much every available free agent, what they always do, and what they should always do: explore every option. Every option. Trades. Signings. New training regimens. Coaching staff alterations. And yes, positional shifts.

It doesn’t mean that every option is actually on the table, let alone a probable outcome. Just that the club’s done its due diligence and are aware of the implications of the choices available to them.

This has the obvious benefit is that the front office is not guessing. If the Marlins call and offer Uggla for a reasonable acquisition cost, they know that Pedroia’s game for short if need be. They don’t suspect he is, they don’t think he is, they know he is. Because they’ve been proactive, and they asked. Does that make it likely? Hardly. I’d bet a pretty reasonable chunk of change that when we open next spring, Pedroia’s not at short. But it can’t hurt to ask. If anything, it can only help.

The less appreciated benefit to this news, and likely one of the reasons the front office is probably happy with the interview (assuming it wasn’t a plant), is that it improves their negotiating position. Even if Scutaro’s advisors suspect that the front office doesn’t want to move their second baseman, they can’t be certain it won’t happen. Which improves, if only slightly, the Red Sox negotiating position.

The interesting question, to me, isn’t whether or not Pedroia can play short. I’m sure he could play the position passably, if not at the level he can handle second or one that we’d be happy with.

The interesting question is whether or not Pedroia knows all of the above; that, effectively, his interview was a negotiating tactic. Because if he knows that and was still so genuine, he’s an even better teammate that Neyer and company think he is.

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4 thoughts on “Pedroia at Short: Desperation or Due Diligence?

  1. Thanks for a well balanced piece, reflective of Marco . . . Scutaro himself. Balance. The optimist in me says that if he can hit 39 doubles in Toronto he can hit 49 at Fenway. Having, in the #9 slot, a legit leadoff batter with good OBP and ability to work a walk and steal a base; a SS-leading 4.07 pitch per AB, a ratio of FB to GB that suggests a Lowell-Lowrie-like ability to stun the Monster, he makes the bottom of the roster a more dangerous place.
    IMO, he has worked hard to get his chance, always moving forward. Now that he has it, he’s going to do Theo proud.
    This comment was originally posted on wicked clevah

  2. Thanks for a well balanced piece, reflective of Marco . . . Scutaro himself. Balance. The optimist in me says that if he can hit 39 doubles in Toronto he can hit 49 at Fenway. Having, in the #9 slot, a legit leadoff batter with good OBP and ability to work a walk and steal a base; a SS-leading 4.07 pitch per AB, a ratio of FB to GB that suggests a Lowell-Lowrie-like ability to stun the Monster, he makes the bottom of the roster a more dangerous place.
    IMO, he has worked hard to get his chance, always moving forward. Now that he has it, he’s going to do Theo proud.
    This comment was originally posted on wicked clevah

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